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PORCELAIN TILE

Porcelain tile is fired at a much higher temperature than regular ceramic tile. This makes porcelain tile much harder and denser than other tile products. Because of its highly durable make-up, porcelain is more resistant to scratches and chips and can withstand temperature extremes. Also, because porcelain almost non-porous, it's stain resistant, has very low water absorption ratings and thus can be used for interior and exterior applications as well as heavy-use and commercial areas.

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POLISHED PORCELAIN TILES

The dense, hard surface of porcelain has made polishing a viable alternative to a glazed surface. This means that a tile can be fired, then a polish cut into the surface, creating a shine without a glaze.

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GLAZED PORCELAIN TILES

A colored, liquid glaze is applied to the surface of a porcelain body. The tile is fired in a kiln at approximately 2,000 degrees. The glazing process defines the color and surface texture and produces a hard, non-porous, impermeable tile with a water absorption rate of 0.5% or less.

Porcelain is much harder than ordinary ceramic tiles and is usually selected, despite its higher price, for its hard wearing nature. Porcelain can be used in both wet and dry areas such as bathrooms, showers and kitchens.

Although porcelain has now been widely used for making tiles for many years, modern production methods and quantities has made porcelain tiles available for the average householder in recent years.

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CERAMIC TILE

Ceramic tile is made up of sand, natural products, and clays and once it has been molded into shape they are then fired in a kiln. When making ceramic tiles they can either be glazed or unglazed, but the majority of homeowners have glazed ceramic tiles in their home.

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CERAMIC VS. PORCELAIN

Ceramic tiles are made with red, brown, or white clay, while porcelain tiles are almost exclusively made with refined and purified white clay. The clays used in porcelain tend to have fewer impurities than clays used in ceramic tiles and have more kaolin and feldspar. This ultimately results in a denser and more durable tile.

NATURAL STONE

A naturally occurring material that can only be formed by three types of geologic processes, igneous or solidification from a molten state, sedimentation and metamorphism. Natural stone created through these processes are known as igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks or metamorphic rocks.

Natural stone is harvested from its original place of deposition in the earth, then cut and machined into final products without alteration to the internal fabric of the material. Common types of natural stone are granite, marble, limestone, travertine, slate, sandstone, onyx, soapstone, etc.

Natural stone can be processed for construction applications, and is often available in various formats, including slabs, tile, flagstone, rubble stone, ashlar veneer, gravel, etc.

Materials can be applied to natural stone to enhance or preserve naturally occurring distinctiveness within the stone; however the natural stone material as created by nature remains identifiable.

Natural stone is used as architectural stone (construction, flooring, cladding, counter tops, curbing, etc.) and as raw block and monument stone for the funerary trade. Natural stone is also used in custom stone engraving. The engraved stone can be either decorative or functional. Natural memorial stones are used as natural burial markers.

CEMENT TILE

Cement tiles are made using a process developed in Southern France in the second half of the 19th century. Today, however, Morocco, Vietnam, Cuba, Turkey…are the major production center. Cement tiles are made by hand with the help of metallic molds and a hydraulic press. The raw materials are Portland cement, sand, marble powder, water and color pigments. Contrary to ceramic tiles, cement tiles are not exposed to firing but gain their strength from curing. The pigment layer is about 3-4 mm which gives the tiles a long lifespan.

Each cement tile is individually made and variations in thickness, size and color as well as imperfections like irregular edges and corners as well as pattern contours being partly blurred are inherent to the manufacturing process. These characteristics add to the tiles’ natural appeal and do not compromise performance.

Pigments and salt present in the cement will deposit onto the surface of the tile. This produces a varied (sometimes almost blotched), chalky look similar to limewash. The variations are particularly evident in solid color tiles and tiles with a not so busy pattern. A large part of the variations and salts present on newly installed tiles will disappear over time and with cleaning but not entirely – this is perfectly normal.

GLASS TILE

Glass was used in mosaics as early as 2500 BC, but it took until the 3rd century BC before innovative artisans in Greece, Persia and India created glass tiles.

Whereas clay tiles are dated as early as 8000 BC, there were significant barriers to the development of glass tiles, included the high temperatures required to melt glass, and the complexities of mastering various annealing curves for glass.

In recent years, glass tiles have become popular for both field and accent tiles. This trend can be attributed to recent technological breakthroughs, as well as the tiles’ inherent properties, in particular their potential to impart intense color and reflect light, and their imperviousness to water.

Glass tile introduces complexities to the installer. Since glass is more rigid than ceramic or porcelain tile, glass tiles break more readily under the duress of substrate shifts.

Since the 1990s, a variety of modern glass tile technologies, including methods to take used glass and recreate it as ‘green’ tiles, has resulted in a resurgence of interest in glass tile as a floor and wall cladding. It is now most commonly used in pools, kitchens, spas, and bathrooms. And while smalti tiles are still popular, small and large format glass products are now commonly formed using cast and fused glass methods. The plasticity of these last two methods has resulted in a wide variety of looks and applications, including floor tiles.[2]

In the late 1990s, special glass tiles have been coated on the back side with a receptive white coating. This has allowed impregnation of heat-transfer dyes by a printing process reproducing high resolution pictures and designs. Custom printed glass tile and glass tile murals exhibit the toughness of glass on the wearing surface with photo-like pictures. These are especially practical in kitchens and showers, where cleanser and moisture resistance are important.

PORCELAIN

CERAMIC

NATURAL STONE

CEMENT TILE

GLASS TILE

PORCELAIN TILE

Porcelain tile is fired at a much higher temperature than regular ceramic tile. This makes porcelain tile much harder and denser than other tile products. Because of its highly durable make-up, porcelain is more resistant to scratches and chips and can withstand temperature extremes. Also, because porcelain almost non-porous, it's stain resistant, has very low water absorption ratings and thus can be used for interior and exterior applications as well as heavy-use and commercial areas.

POLISHED PORCELAIN TILES

Porcelain99D3C04549A04CCA9B9175C7B74DC0A1

The dense, hard surface of porcelain has made polishing a viable alternative to a glazed surface. This means that a tile can be fired, then a polish cut into the surface, creating a shine without a glaze.

GLAZED PORCELAIN TILES

PorcelainBE5DF22FFB68461E9C4D0E0A88959E92

A colored, liquid glaze is applied to the surface of a porcelain body. The tile is fired in a kiln at approximately 2,000 degrees. The glazing process defines the color and surface texture and produces a hard, non-porous, impermeable tile with a water absorption rate of 0.5% or less.

Porcelain is much harder than ordinary ceramic tiles and is usually selected, despite its higher price, for its hard wearing nature. Porcelain can be used in both wet and dry areas such as bathrooms, showers and kitchens.

Although porcelain has now been widely used for making tiles for many years, modern production methods and quantities has made porcelain tiles available for the average householder in recent years.

CERAMIC TILE

7B26B2E7B04944798E5E05B2045813B9 (1)

Ceramic tile is made up of sand, natural products, and clays and once it has been molded into shape they are then fired in a kiln. When making ceramic tiles they can either be glazed or unglazed, but the majority of homeowners have glazed ceramic tiles in their home.

CERAMIC VS. PORCELAIN

B7AB1F03E98F4A0687CF12CE8420EB16

Ceramic tiles are made with red, brown, or white clay, while porcelain tiles are almost exclusively made with refined and purified white clay. The clays used in porcelain tend to have fewer impurities than clays used in ceramic tiles and have more kaolin and feldspar. This ultimately results in a denser and more durable tile.

NATURAL STONE

A naturally occurring material that can only be formed by three types of geologic processes, igneous or solidification from a molten state, sedimentation and metamorphism. Natural stone created through these processes are known as igneous rocks, sedimentary rocks or metamorphic rocks.

Natural stone is harvested from its original place of deposition in the earth, then cut and machined into final products without alteration to the internal fabric of the material. Common types of natural stone are granite, marble, limestone, travertine, slate, sandstone, onyx, soapstone, etc.

Natural stone can be processed for construction applications, and is often available in various formats, including slabs, tile, flagstone, rubble stone, ashlar veneer, gravel, etc.

Materials can be applied to natural stone to enhance or preserve naturally occurring distinctiveness within the stone; however the natural stone material as created by nature remains identifiable.

Natural stone is used as architectural stone (construction, flooring, cladding, counter tops, curbing, etc.) and as raw block and monument stone for the funerary trade. Natural stone is also used in custom stone engraving. The engraved stone can be either decorative or functional. Natural memorial stones are used as natural burial markers.

CEMENT TILE

Cement tiles are made using a process developed in Southern France in the second half of the 19th century. Today, however, Morocco, Vietnam, Cuba, Turkey…are the major production center. Cement tiles are made by hand with the help of metallic molds and a hydraulic press. The raw materials are Portland cement, sand, marble powder, water and color pigments. Contrary to ceramic tiles, cement tiles are not exposed to firing but gain their strength from curing. The pigment layer is about 3-4 mm which gives the tiles a long lifespan.

Each cement tile is individually made and variations in thickness, size and color as well as imperfections like irregular edges and corners as well as pattern contours being partly blurred are inherent to the manufacturing process. These characteristics add to the tiles’ natural appeal and do not compromise performance.

Pigments and salt present in the cement will deposit onto the surface of the tile. This produces a varied (sometimes almost blotched), chalky look similar to limewash. The variations are particularly evident in solid color tiles and tiles with a not so busy pattern. A large part of the variations and salts present on newly installed tiles will disappear over time and with cleaning but not entirely – this is perfectly normal.

GLASS TILE

Glass was used in mosaics as early as 2500 BC, but it took until the 3rd century BC before innovative artisans in Greece, Persia and India created glass tiles.

Whereas clay tiles are dated as early as 8000 BC, there were significant barriers to the development of glass tiles, included the high temperatures required to melt glass, and the complexities of mastering various annealing curves for glass.

In recent years, glass tiles have become popular for both field and accent tiles. This trend can be attributed to recent technological breakthroughs, as well as the tiles’ inherent properties, in particular their potential to impart intense color and reflect light, and their imperviousness to water.

Glass tile introduces complexities to the installer. Since glass is more rigid than ceramic or porcelain tile, glass tiles break more readily under the duress of substrate shifts.

Since the 1990s, a variety of modern glass tile technologies, including methods to take used glass and recreate it as ‘green’ tiles, has resulted in a resurgence of interest in glass tile as a floor and wall cladding. It is now most commonly used in pools, kitchens, spas, and bathrooms. And while smalti tiles are still popular, small and large format glass products are now commonly formed using cast and fused glass methods. The plasticity of these last two methods has resulted in a wide variety of looks and applications, including floor tiles.[2]

In the late 1990s, special glass tiles have been coated on the back side with a receptive white coating. This has allowed impregnation of heat-transfer dyes by a printing process reproducing high resolution pictures and designs. Custom printed glass tile and glass tile murals exhibit the toughness of glass on the wearing surface with photo-like pictures. These are especially practical in kitchens and showers, where cleanser and moisture resistance are important.

LOCATION
MODERN TILE SUPPLY | 9777 BUSINESS PARK DR, SACRAMENTO, CA, 95827

PHONE
(916) 245-3150

HOURS
Tuesday – Friday: 9AM – 5PM | Saturday: 10AM – 4PM

LOCATION
MODERN TILE SUPPLY
9777 BUSINESS PARK DR
SACRAMENTO, CA, 95827

PHONE
(916) 245-3150

HOURS
Tuesday – Friday: 9AM – 5PM
Saturday: 10AM – 4PM